My Maternal 5th. Great Irish Grandfather, Archdeacon William A. Clark

Limerick City, Limerick, Ireland collage
Limerick
City in the Republic of Ireland

Description

Limerick is a major city in the Republic of Ireland, set in Munster province in the south of the country. Its compact old town is known for the medieval-era St. Mary’s Cathedral and St. John’s square, which is lined with Georgian townhouses. Standing along the River Shannon, the 13th-century King John’s Castle is one of the city’s most recognizable sites.

From top, left to right: People’s Park, St. Mary’s Cathedral, Riverpoint, Daniel O’Connell Monument, Georgian architecture at Pery Square, King John’s Castle
Coat of arms of Limerick
Coat of arms
Motto(s): 

Urbs Antiqua Fuit
Studiisque Asperrima Belli(Latin)

“There was an ancient city
very fierce in the skills of war”
source: Wikipedia

The history of Limerick stretches back to its establishment by the Vikings as a walled city on King’s Island (an island in the River Shannon) in 812, and its charter in 1197.

A great castle was built on the orders of King John in 1200. It was besieged three times in the 17th century, resulting in the famous Treaty of Limerick and the flight of the defeated Catholic leaders abroad. Much of the city was built during the following Georgian prosperity, which ended abruptly with the Act of Union in 1800. Today the city has a growing multicultural population. source: Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Limerick

Limerick, Ireland

The history of Ireland from 1691–1800 was marked by the dominance of the Protestant Ascendancy. These were Anglo-Irish families of the Anglican Church of Ireland, whose English ancestors had settled Ireland in the wake of its conquest by England and colonisation in the Plantations of Ireland, and had taken control most of the land. Many were absentee landlords based in England, but others lived full-time in Ireland and increasingly identified as Irish. (See Early Modern Ireland 1536-1691).

During this time, Ireland was nominally an autonomous Kingdom with its own Parliament; in actuality it was a client state controlled by the King of Great Britain and supervised by his cabinet in London. The great majority of its population, Roman Catholics, were excluded from power and land ownership under the penal laws. The second-largest group, the Presbyterians in Ulster, owned land and businesses but could not vote and had no political power. The period begins with the defeat of the Catholic Jacobites in the Williamite War in Ireland in 1691 and ends with the Acts of Union 1800, which formally annexed Ireland in a United Kingdom from 1 January 1801 and dissolved the Irish Parliament. source: History_of_Ireland

Name: Archdeacon William A. Clark, son of Sandy and Martha Clark

Birth: 1769 in Limerick, County of Limerick, Ireland

Christened: 18 March 1769 in Saint Mary’s Cathedral,  Limerick, County of Limerick, Ireland

Married: about 1790 in Ireland to Annie A. Clark (maiden name unknown)

Children: (2)

Mary Clark (Hammell), and Ellen Clark (Hammell)

Name: William Clark
Event Type: Immigration
Event Date: 1840
Event Place: New York City, New York, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 70
Birth Year (Estimated): 1770
Ship Name: Marutius
Affiliate Publication Number: M237
Affiliate Publication Title: Passenger Lists of vessels arriving at New York, 1820-1897
Affiliate Film Number: 44
GS Film Number: 000002289
Digital Folder Number: 004678303
Image Number: 00197
Citing this Record
“New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1891,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVRQ-MT67 : 11 March 2018), William Clark, 1840; citing Immigration, New York City, New York, United States, NARA microfilm publication M237 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 2,289.

 

Name: William A Clark
Event Type: Census
Event Date: 1840
Event Place: Cornwall, Orange, New York, United States
Page: 125
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: M704
Affiliate Film Number: 322
GS Film Number: 0017202
Digital Folder Number: 005154826
Image Number: 00254

Citing this Record
“United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHYC-DGW : 16 August 2017), William A Clark, Cornwall, Orange, New York, United States; citing p. 125, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 322; FHL microfilm 17,202.

Name: William A Clark
Event Type: Naturalization
Event Date: 1856
Event Place: Saratoga, New York, United States
Volume: County court minutes 1843-1856
Record Number: 29
Digital Folder Number: 005407259
Image Number: 00378
Citing this Record
“New York, County Naturalization Records, 1791-1980,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QGB5-C1CF : 21 September 2019), William A Clark, 1856; citing Naturalization, Saratoga, New York, United States, citing multiple County Clerk offices of New York; FHL microfilm 005407259.

 

Manhattan-Bridge-East-River-Brooklyn-Borough-New York City-New-York

Manhattan-Bridge-East-River-Brooklyn-Borough-New York City-New-York

Died: 25 June 1867 in Brooklyn, New York City, New York

Burial: June 1867 in Green-Wood Cemetery

Brooklyn, Kings County (Brooklyn), New York, USA
Findagrave Memorial ID: 136119383  

Green-Wood Cemetery

Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, Kings, New York

My Maternal 6th. Great Grandfather, Pvt. Robert Hammell, Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Landscape

Pennsylvania

Name: Pvt. Robert Hammell, father of William Hammell, Sr.

Born: about 1748 in Ireland? (exact dates and location unknown)

American Revolutionary War, Pennsylvania, 1765-1783

American Revolutionary War Map, Pennsylvania’s Militias  (1765-1783)

Name Robert Hammell
Event Type Military Service
Event Date 22 Oct 1777
Page 477
Citing this Record
“United States Rosters of Revolutionary War Soldiers and Sailors, 1775-1783,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QG29-4FYY : 16 March 2018), Robert Hammell, 22 Oct 1777; citing Military Service, , Citing various published state rosters, United States; FHL microfilm 102229256.

Name Hammel
Event Type Military Service
Event Date Aug 1779
Event Place Pennsylvania, United States
Event Place Pennsylvania, United States
Military Rank Private
Citing this Record
“United States Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QL6T-R1QY : 15 March 2018), Hammel, Aug 1779; citing Aug 1779, Pennsylvania, United States, citing NARA microfilm publication M246. Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Services, 1980. FHL microfilm 830,360.

revolutionary-war-spirit of 1776

Revolutionary-War-Spirit of 1776-Pennsylvania

The Spirit of '76 (originally entitled Yankee Doodle), painted by Archibald Willard in the late nineteenth century, an iconic image relating to the patriotic sentiment surrounding the American Revolutionary War

The Spirit of ’76 (originally entitled Yankee Doodle), painted by Archibald Willard in the late nineteenth century, an iconic image relating to the patriotic sentiment surrounding the American Revolutionary War

Robt Hammel

United States Census, 1790
Name: Robt Hammel
Event Type: Census
Event Date: 1790
Event Place: Hopewell, Newton, Tyborn, and Westpensboro, Cumberland, Pennsylvania, United States
Page: 27
source: familysearch.org

Died: after 1790 in Cumberland, Pennsylvania

Wife is unknown. He had one son, William Hammell, Sr. (1768-1816). His son, William served in the U.S. Marines during the War of 1812 in New York. His grandsons, Eli and William Hammell, Jr. served during the War of 1812 in New York also.

Sackets-Harbor-War-of-1812-New York

Sackets-Harbor-War-of-1812-New York-Reenactment-Weekend

The War of 1812 was a conflict fought between the United States, the United Kingdom, and their respective allies from June 1812 to February 1815. Historians in Britain often see it as a minor theater of the Napoleonic Wars; in the United States and Canada, it is seen as a war in its own right.

WikipediaDatesJun 18, 1812 – Feb 18, 1815

Tomb_of_the_Unknown_Revolutionary_War_Soldier-Pennsylvania

“Freedom is a light, for which many men have died in darkness”.  Monument in Pennsylvania dedicated to the thousands of unknown American Revolutionary War soldiers killed fighting to create these United States of America monument dedicated in 1791.

 

Patriots (also known as Revolutionaries, Continentals, Rebels, or American Whigs) were those colonists of the Thirteen Colonies who rejected British rule during the American Revolution and declared the United States of America as an independent nation in July 1776. Their decision was based on the political philosophy of republicanism as expressed by spokesmen such as Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Thomas Paine. They were opposed by the Loyalists who supported continued British rule.

Patriots represented the spectrum of social, economic, and ethnic backgrounds. They included lawyers such as John Adams, students such as Alexander Hamilton, planters such as Thomas Jefferson and George Mason, merchants such as Alexander McDougall and John Hancock, and farmers such as Daniel Shays and Joseph Plumb Martin. They also included slaves and freemen such as Crispus Attucks, the first casualty of the American Revolution; James Armistead Lafayette, who served as a double agent for the Continental Army; and Jack Sisson, leader of the first successful black operation mission in American history under the command of Colonel William Barton, resulting in the capture of British General Richard Prescott. Wikipedia

My Maternal 6th.Great Grandfather, William Peavy, Sr, England

Wadhurst Castle, England

My maternal 6th. great grandfather, William Peavy, Sr.

Born: 1730 in Wadhurst, East Sussex, England.

Waterside-House-Sussex-Uk

Married: 19 May 1755 in Wadhurst, East Sussex, England to Catherine Hammond.

Children: James, William, Jr, Henry, and Catherine Peavy (Hammell).

Died: 10 November 1809 in Sussex, England.

Buried: 11 November 1809 in Saint Peter’s Churchyard, Chichester, Chichester, West Sussex, England.

Birth:  1730
East Sussex, England
Death:  Nov. 10, 1809
Chichester District
West Sussex, England
My maternal 6th. great grandfather, William Peavy, Sr.

Husband of Catherine Hammond.
Married 19 May 1755 in Wadhurst, Sussex, England.

Children: James, William, Jr, Henry, and Catherine Peavy (Hammell). 
Family links:
 Spouse:
  Catherine Hammond Peavy (1732 – 1798)
 
 Children:
  Catherine Peavy Hammell (1776 – 1811)
 

 Screenshot (452)
Burial:
St Peter the Great Churchyard
Chichester
Chichester District
West Sussex, England
St. George, Donnington, West Sussex, England

St. George, Donnington, West Sussex

Created by: Texas Tudors
Record added: Nov 10, 2015
Find A Grave Memorial# 154825619

 

My Maternal 5th. Great English Grandmother, Catherine (Peavy) Hammell

Image result for West Devon Borough, Devon, England

Devon Coast, England

Dorset and East Devon Coast, England

Dorset and Devon, English Coast

Name: Catherine (Peavy) (aka spelled Peevey  and Povey)  Hammell (aka Hammel),  daughter of William Peavy, Sr. and Catherine Hammond.

Birth: 1776
West Devon Borough
Devon, England

Christened: 11 September 1776

Stoke Damerel, Devonshire, England

Image result for West Devon Borough, Devon, England

Stoke Damerel, Devonshire, England

Trinity_Church_Bird's_Eye_View_New_York_City_1846

Trinity Church Parish, Manhattan, New York, 1846

Married: William Hammell (aka Hammel), Sr. on 17 October 1791 in Trinity Church Parish, Manhattan, New York.

NYC_-_Trinity_Church_-_Watts_statue

Trinity Church Parish, Manhattan, New York, New York

William Hammell
Spouse’s Name Catherine Peevey
Event Date 17 Oct 1791
Event Place Trinity Church Parish, New York, New York

Citing this Record
“New York Marriages, 1686-1980,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VK1V-ZKZ : 12 December 2014), William Hammell and Catherine Peevey, 17 Oct 1791; citing reference ; FHL microfilm 974.7 B2N V. 69-72.

Trinity Church Cemetery NYC 9109.JPG

Trinity Church Cemetery, Manhattan, New York

Mother of William Hammell, Jr. and Eli Hammell (total number of children unknown)

Grandmother of Maria “Mary” A. Hammell (Linderman).
Death date is estimate, but it was after 1810, because she appeared in the 1810 U.S. Census for New York.

Name: C Hammell
Event Place: 1810  Oneida, New York
Page Number: 398
Line Number: 1202
Affiliate Publication Number: M252
Affiliate Film Number: 33
GS Film number: 0181387
Digital Folder Number: 004433274
Image Number: 00071

Family links:
Spouse:
William Hammell, Sr. (1768 – 1816)

Children:
William Hammell, Jr. (1792 – 1857)
Eli Hammell                  (1795 – 1837)

Death: after 1810

Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA

Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum

Burial:
Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum
Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA

Trinity Church Cemetery consists of three separate burial grounds associated with Trinity Church in New York City. The first was established in the Churchyard located at 74 Trinity Place at Wall Street and Broadway. In 1842, the church, running out of space in its churchyard, established Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum in Upper Manhattan between Broadway and Riverside Drive, at the Chapel of the Intercession (now The Church of the Intercession, New York), formerly the location of John James Audubon‘s estate. A third burial place is the Churchyard of St. Paul’s Chapel.

A no longer extant Trinity Church Cemetery was the Old Saint John’s Burying Ground for St. John’s Chapel. This location is bounded by Hudson, Leroy and Clarkson Streets near Hudson Square. It was in use from 1806–52 with over 10,000 burials, mostly poor and young. In 1897, it was turned into St. John’s Park, with most of the burials left in place. The park was later renamed Hudson Park, and is now James J. Walker Park.

The burial grounds have been the final resting place for many historic figures since the Churchyard cemetery opened in 1697. A non-denominational cemetery, it is listed in the United States National Register of Historic Places and is the only remaining active cemetery in Manhattan. There are two bronze plaques at the Church of the Intercession cemetery commemorating the Battle of Fort Washington, which included some of the fiercest fighting of the Revolutionary War.

Trinity Church Cemetery, along with Broadway, marks the center of the Heritage Rose District of NYC 

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Feb 19, 2015
Find A Grave Memorial# 142794725

Manhattan, New York City, New York

Manhattan, New York

NY-county map

New York Counties map

My Maternal 5th. Great Grandfather, William Hammell, Sr, Pennsylvania and New York

Pennsylvania Landscape

Pennsylvania Landscape

Name: William Hammell (aka Hammel), Sr.

Independence_Mall__C.Smyth_Philadelphia_Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Trinity Church in New York City by Gryffindor

Trinity Church in Manhattan, New York City, New York by Gryffindor

 

Birth: 1768
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA

Death: Sept. 7, 1816
Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA 

Married:  17 October 1791 to Catherine Peavy, (aka spelled Peevey, Pavey, and Povey),  in Trinity Church Parish, Manhattan, New York City, New York.

Name William Hammel
Event Type Census
Event Date 1790
Event Place Canajoxharrie, Montgomery, New York, United States
Page 102
Record: 
Hammel, William–5-0-3-0-0
1st No.-Free white males over 16 years
2nd No.-Free white males under 16 years
3rd No.-Free white females
4th No.-All other free persons
5th No.-Slaves    
Citing this Record

“United States Census, 1790,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHKG-R4H : accessed 22 July 2018), William Hammel, Canajoxharrie, Montgomery, New York, United States; citing p. 102, NARA microfilm publication M637, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 6; FHL microfilm 568,146.

brewery of l. bierbauer, mill street, Canajoharie, Montgomery, NY

Brewery of L. Bierbauer, Mill street, Canajoharie, Montgomery, New York

 

Trinity_Church_Bird's_Eye_View_New_York_City_1846

Trinity Church, New York

NYC_-_Trinity_Church_-_Watts_statue

Name William Hammell
Spouse’s Name Catherine Peevey
Event Date 17 Oct 1791
Event Place Trinity Church Parish,New York, New York, New York
Citing this Record
“New York Marriages, 1686-1980,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VK1V-ZKZ : 12 December 2014), William Hammell and Catherine Peevey, 17 Oct 1791; citing reference ; FHL microfilm 974.7 B2N V. 69-72.

Trinity Church is an historic, active, well-endowed parish church in the Episcopal Diocese of New York. It is located near the intersection of Wall Street and Broadway, in the lower Manhattan section of New York City, New York. Trinity, a traditional High church, is a very active parish around Episcopal Church and the worldwide Anglican Communion in missionary, outreach, and fellowship. Located at: 155 & 75 Broadway, Manhattan, New York County, New York,  USA http://www.trinitywallstreet.o…

Catherine Peevey (aka Peavy) was born in 1776 in Stoke Damerel, Devonshire, England, and christened on 11 September 1776 there.

Name William Hammel
Event Type Census
Event Date 1810
Event Place New York Ward 10, New York, New York, United States
Page 646

Citing this Record

“United States Census, 1810,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XH2S-S7M : accessed 22 July 2018), William Hammel, New York Ward 10, New York, New York, United States; citing p. 646, NARA microfilm publication M252 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 32; FHL microfilm 181,386.
Records found for two children, William and Eli Hammell (my 4th. great grandfather), no records found of any other children.
Grandfather of Maria “Mary” Ann Hammell (Linderman), my 3rd. great maternal grandmother.
Manhattan, New York
HAMMELL
This unusual name has two possible origins, the first of which is Scottish but is ultimately of Norman origin, and is a locational surname from the place called “Haineville” or “Henneville” in Manche.
The place name derives from the Germanic personal name “Hagano”, which means “hawthorn” and was originally a nickname, found in Medieval England as “Hain” and “Heyne”, with the Old French word “ville”, meaning settlement, village.
The surname as Ham(m)ill and Hom(m)ill was most commonly found in the area known as “Roughwood” in Ayshire. The second origin is from an Anglo-Saxon nickname for a scarred or marred person, from the Old English pre 7th “hamel” meaning “scarred, mutilated”.
On February 10th 1670, Leonard, son of Leonard and Elizabeth Hammell, were married in St. Giles Cripplegate, London.
The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Hameville, which was dated circa 1194, in the Records of Holm Cultram, during the reign of King William of Scotland, known as “The Lion”, 1165 – 1214. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation.
In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Hammell#ixzz2WAdwOeb6William Hamill

United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps
Name William Hamill
Event Type Military Service
Event Date 14 May 1811
Event Place United States
Name William Hammel
Event Type Military Service
Event Date 1812-1815
Event Place United States
Citing this Record
United States War of 1812 Index to Service Records, 1812-1815, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q29K-4217 : 11 March 2016), William Hammel, 1812-1815; citing NARA microfilm publication M602 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); roll 90; FHL microfilm 882,608.
name:Willm Hammell
gender:Male
burial date:
burial place:
death date:07 Sep 1816
death place:New York, New York
age:48
birth date:1768
birthplace:Philadelphia
occupation:
race:
marital status:
spouse’s name:
father’s name:
father’s birthplace:
mother’s name:
mother’s birthplace:
indexing project (batch) number:B05590-5
system origin:New York-EASy
source film number:447544
reference number:
Citing this Record
“New York Deaths and Burials, 1795-1952,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F6M7-NZV : accessed 11 Dec 2012), Willm Hammell, 1768; citing reference , FHL microfilm 447544.

Family links:

Spouse:
Catherine Peevey (aka Peavy) (1776 – 1811)

Children:

William Hammell (1792 – 1857)
Eli Hammell           (1795 – 1837)

War_of_1812_Montage

War of 1812. Perhaps no other state played a greater role in the War of 1812 than New York. During the 32-month war, also known as America’s Second War for Independence, the Americans fought the British on land and water from Buffalo to Plattsburgh.
New York & the War of 1812 | Visit Historic Forts & Battlefields
https://paththroughhistory.iloveny.com › themes › war-of-1812

Historical Background
The War of 1812 is barely acknowledged in American social studies textbooks. It remains an obscure and little understood period of American history, falling between the traditional thematic divisions of the American Revolution and Jacksonian Democracy. For most people, the War of 1812 is simply recognized as the inspirational moment that gave America the Star Spangled Banner, as Francis Scott Key witnessed from a British ship the resolutely waving flag amidst the conflict at Fort McHenry in Baltimore; generated the dramatic narrative describing the legendary heroic feat of Dolly Madison, who rushed to gather up and save White House treasures just moments before the British burned down D.C.; and established Andrew Jackson as a military leader by his postwar victory (the Treaty of Ghent had already been signed, ending the war) at the Battle of New Orleans—a feat that subsequently earned him the Presidential election in 1829.

Aside from these iconic associations with the War of 1812, the global consensus is that the conflict was a minor hiccup in the greater ongoing struggle between Britain and France, its significance dwarfed by the almost simultaneous occurrence of the end of the Napoleonic Wars that brought about great changes in nineteenth century Europe.

What are not as evident from the traditional historical interpretations of this time period are the great and lasting changes the War of 1812 brought about in the North American landscape. The nation of Canada was forged from the experience, and the many nations of Native people began to disappear from the North American map. While the Treaty of Ghent may have restored the European status quo antebellum, it forever transformed the North American landscape as the Treaty purposefully excluded Native Americans in the postwar settlement agreements, and the experience of the war left colonists in Canada with a new sense of unity and pride.

Both the British and the Americans had depended on Native American support in the conflict. Many Seneca, Onondaga, Oneida and Tuscarora of the Six Nations Confederacy fought with the Americans, while the Mohawk sided with the British. According to research done at the National Archives:
More than 1,000 Native Americans served during the War of 1812. They were organized in more than 100 companies, detachments, or parties. About half were Choctaws, and half were either Creeks or Cherokees. Units from other tribes included Blue’s Detachment of Chickasaw Indians (discussed below), Capt. Wape Pilesey’s Company of Mounted Shawano Indians, and Capt. Abner W. Hendrick’s Detachment of Stockbridge Indians. (source: Collins, Prologue Magazine, Winter 2007, vol.39, no.4, paragraph 5)

Further west, along the Great Lakes border areas, the Indians under Tecumseh’s leadership became allies with the British against the United States. The Potawatomi, Menominee, Ho-chunk, Ojibwa, Ottawa, Santee Dakota, Sauk, and Fox all fought as British allies in the War of 1812. Many of these First Nations had allied themselves early on with the French, but following British victory over the French in the War for Empire (French and Indian Wars), many of the Native communities now saw the British presence as the only wedge to keep the American settlers from advancing into their territories in the West and South.

The Treaty of Ghent acknowledged not one concession to any Native American nation, even though several promises had been made during the conflict. Without British influence to preserve their land claims in negotiations, and with no formal or legal authority to recognize their role in the conflict, Native Americans were subsequently forced to endure a long and painful period from the end of the conflict up until at least the beginning of the 20th century, in which they would lose people, land, and dignity.
The alliances between Native Americans and the British in the War of 1812 increased hostile relations between some Native Americans and American citizens.

This tension ultimately served to strengthen negative attitudes among American citizens, extending to more and more hostile government policies of the state and federal governments, often resulting in removal of Native people from their lands. Accounts of the deteriorating relations between Native people and Americans are numerous and can be found in records at local, state, and national repositories (see for example: Red Jacket Rejects Sale of Buffalo Creek Reservation: July 9, 1819, from SUNY Oswego’s Granger Collection, and Chronicles of Oklahoma, Indian Removal, from Oklahoma Historical Society).

Following the American Revolution, the British loyalists who fled to what was then known as Upper Canada, had integrated themselves into British and French settlements that were now operating under British rule. When war broke out between the Americans and British, many colonists in Canada saw this as yet another affront to their British rulers.

At the same time, American leaders and citizens were entertaining ideas of invading and taking Upper Canada from British control to counter the longstanding British foothold in Montreal and Quebec that allowed the British to continue to operate with force on the continent.

The British strategy was to employ their superior naval strength to counter Americans along the eastern seaboard areas, specifically in the South (New Orleans), mid-Atlantic (Baltimore), and Hudson Valley (via the Great Lakes and Seaway), with the goal of driving a wedge between American forces in the North and South.

The British colonists of Canada, recognizing their precarious situation as a target for American forces hoping to cripple British naval superiority, rallied together to combat the invaders. To this day, Canadian history portrays with much patriotism the heroism of Colonel Brock and the Canadian forces at the Battle of Lundy’s Lane, much as American history recounts colonial forces overcoming great odds against the British army in the battles of the American Revolution. In the aftermath of the conflict, Canadian colonists struggled with the British government to gain more opportunities for self-governance, peaking with the 1837 Patriot War, resulting in the Unification of Canada in 1840 and, ultimately, independence for the nation in 1867.
War of 1812 in Western New York
In terms of local activity, the War of 1812 left an indelible mark on the physical, social, and political landscape. In her book, A History of the Town of Amherst, New York, 1818-1965 (*also found on New York Heritage here), former Town Clerk & Historian Sue Miller Young writes that during the War of 1812, American troops were stationed in Williamsville in the area between Garrison Road and Ellicott Creek. American soldiers and British prisoners were treated in a field hospital and log barracks that lined Garrison Road. A small cemetery, located on what is now Aero Drive, between Wehrle Drive and Youngs Road, was used to bury the men who did not survive their wounds or illnesses. General Winfield Scott used the Evans House (demolished ca. 1927) as his headquarters in the spring of 1813, when his entire army of over 5,000 men was stationed in Williamsville. Later the same year, when the British burned Buffalo, people fled to the safety of Williamsville and nearby Harris Hill.
Another local landmark is the site of the Flint Hill Encampment. The Army of the Frontier under General Alexander Smythe set up camp at Granger’s farm during the winter of 1812-1813 in anticipation of invading Canada. Nearly 300 soldiers died there of camp disease. Farmers Daniel Chapin and Rowland Cotton were left to bury the dead in Granger’s meadow, known today as Delaware Park (source: Historic Markers, Monuments, and Memorials of Buffalo, New York). For a long time after the conclusion of the War of 1812, American and British-Canadian relations remained strained and guarded. For this reason, the U.S. Army maintained a camp at Poinsett Barracks in Buffalo (now the location of the historic Wilcox Mansion on Delaware Avenue). The War of 1812 was and remains an important part of First Nations, Canadian, American, and local history.

source: http://www.nyheritage.org/collections/war-1812

 

Main Entrance to Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum, by Neil Funkhouser, 7-17-2016Main Entrance to Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum, by Neil Funkhouser, July 17, 2016

Burial: 
Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum
Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA

Trinity Church Cemetery, Manhattan, New York, by Ginny MAdded by: Ginny M, March 3, 2005

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: May 15, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 110569093

My Maternal 3rd. Great Grandmother, Mary Ann Hammell, Scottish and Irish

Newfield Covered Bridge, Newfield, New York USA, photo by Jon Reis

Birth: 1817 Newfield, Tompkins County, New York, USA

Death: Mar. 7, 1884 Winona, Winona County, Minnesota, USA 

Daughter of Eli Hammell of New York, the Hammell’s emigrated from Scotland in the 1700’s, and Ellen Hammell of Ireland emigrated before 1815 (she was Irish but I have no record of her maiden name).

Maria Ann “Mary” Hammell married Abraham Linderman on 26 November 1835 in Newfield Twp, Tompkins County, New York.

Canyon Bridge, Newfield, Tompkins, New York

Moved to Kane County, Illinois between 1837-8 with Abraham’s father, Ezekiel Linderman.

 

Abraham and Mary moved to Winona, Winona County, Minnesota in 1856.

 

The old Linderman Home place was at: 231 E. Mark St., Winona, Winona County, Minnesota.

They resided together until 1884 when Mary passed away, and Abraham resided there up until 1893 when he passed.

Mary & Abraham had two adopted daughters, Lizzie and Mary Linderman, and no sons.

They had adopted daughter, Elizabeth A. “Lizzie” Linderman, who resided with them for years, She married Joseph James, and then a Loftus.

The Linderman’s were were baptized as Lutheran.

DEATH OF OLD SETTLERS
LINDERMAN
“Mary Linderman, wife of A. (Abe)Linderman, died on the 7th. inst., at her home in this city in her 69th. year. As Mr. and Mrs. Linderman came to reside in Winona in April, 1856, her death takes another from the already diminished list of old settlers. For the past year, Mrs. Linderman has been a sufferer from the disease which finally terminated in dropsy and death, but had the unremitting attention of the members of her family and other kind friends. Mrs. Linderman was a woman of marked industry and force of character, and many can testify to her great kindness of heart. A large company of friends were present at the funeral and followed the remains to their resting place in Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota.” source publication: Winona Daily Republican Newspaper; Date: 1884 March 10; Page 3

WOODLAWN CEMETERY, WINONA, MINNESOTA, LINDERMAN, A, DEED: 262 & 294, P-6-6- 380, N 1/2, PLOT: 35, SECTION: I. INTERMENT NUMBER: 2450.

name:Mary Lindemann
event:Census
event place:Winona, Township 107, Range 7, Winona, Minnesota
gender:Female
age:42
race:
birthplace:New York
estimated birth year:1815
family number:27
line number:24
film number:944290
digital folder number:004539672
image number:00301
Household Gender Age Birthplace
Abraham LindemannM49New York
Mary LindemannF42New York
Eliza LindemannF14Illinois
Citing this Record
“Minnesota, Territorial Census, 1857,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/3DC9-FW2 : accessed 16 Oct 2012), Mary Lindemann in household of Abraham Lindemann

name: Mary Linderman
residence: , Winona, Minnesota
ward: 3d Ward City Of Winona
age: 44 years
estimated birth year: 1816
birthplace: New York
gender: Female
page: 72
family number: 542
film number: 803576
dgs number: 4233359
image number: 00380
nara number: M653
Citing this Record
“United States Census, 1860,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M4LL-VTL : accessed 04 Mar 2013), Mary Linderman, , Winona, Minnesota; citing p. 72, family 542; NARA microfilm publication M653, FHL microfilm 803576.

1865 Census for Winona, Minnesota shows:
name:Mary Linderman
event:Census
event date:1865
event place:Winona, 02, Winona, Minnesota, United States
gender:Female
race:
family number:162
volume:11
line number:72
film number:565716
digital folder number:004539664
image number:00891
HouseholdGenderAgeBirthplace
A LindermanM
Mary LindermanF
Joseph JamesM
Lizzie JamesF
Mary LindermanF
John FreebornM
(source citation: familysearch.org website)

name:A Linderman
residence:Winona City, Winona, Minnesota
age:65
estimated birth year:1810
father’s birthplace:New York
mother’s birthplace:
birthplace:New York
race:White
gender:Male
line number:23
family number:1057
film number:0565731
HouseholdGenderAgeBirthplace
A LindermanMNew York
Mary LindermanFNew York
Mary LindermanFWinona
Charles LindermanMCanada
Edward LindermanMWinona
Citing this Record
“Minnesota, State Census, 1875,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MKJS-F2V : accessed 16 Oct 2012), A Linderman in household of A Linderman, Winona City, Winona, Minnesota.

name: Mary Linderman
event place: Winona City, Winona, Minnesota
age: 58
birth year (estimated): 1817
father’s birthplace:
mother’s birthplace: New York
birthplace: New York
race: White
gender: Female
line number: 24
family number: 1057
gs film number: 0565731
Household Gender Age Birthplace
A Linderman M New York (head)
Mary Linderman F New York (wife)
Mary Linderman F Winona (daughter)
Charles Linderman M Canada (nephew?)
Edward Linderman M Winona (grandson)
Citing this Record
“Minnesota, State Census, 1875,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MKJS-F2K : accessed 04 Mar 2013), Mary Linderman in entry for A Linderman, 1875.

name: Mary Linderman
gender: Female
burial date:
burial place:
death date: 07 Mar 1884
death place: Winona City, Winona County, Minnesota
age: 67
birth date: 1817
birthplace:
occupation:
race: White
marital status: Married
spouse’s name:
father’s name:
father’s birthplace:
mother’s name:
mother’s birthplace:
indexing project (batch) number: B59705-5
system origin: Minnesota-EASy
gs film number: 1377829
reference id: 159
Citing this Record
“Minnesota, Deaths and Burials, 1835-1990,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FDZM-7LP : accessed 04 Mar 2013), Mary Linderman, 07 Mar 1884.

Family links:  
Parents:
Eli Hammell (1795 – 1837)
Ellen Hammell (1798 – 1833)

Spouse:
Abraham (Abe) Linderman (1811 – 1891)

Children: (2) adopted daughters according to Abraham Linderman’s will
Elizabeth A. Linderman Loftus (1843 – 1909)
Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)

Inscription: 

MOTHER

 

Mother-Mary Hammell Linderman- Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Adopted mother of Lizzie and Mary Linderman.Wife of Abraham Linderman

“Mother”- Mary Hammell Linderman- Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Winona County, Minnesota. Adopted mother of Lizzie and Mary Linderman.Wife of Abraham Linderman.

Abraham & Mary Linderman Urn in family plot, Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Winona, Minnesota

ABRAHAM LINDERMAN Family Plot Urn in 1996

 

All that is left of the Abraham Linderman Family Plot Urn, 2008

All that is left of the LINDERMAN urn with flowers, 2008

Burial: 
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA
Plot: 35

Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota

 

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069161

My Maternal 4th. Great Irish Grandmother, Ellen Clark (Hammell)

Dingle Peninsula, Irish Coast

Ireland’s romantic Dingle Peninsula, photo courtesy of  Dominic Bonuccelli

Cliffs of Mohr, IrelandBallynoe Stone Circle, Ballynoe, County Down, Northern Ireland

Name: Ellen Clark, daughter of Archdeacon William A. and Annie Clark of County Limerick, Ireland.

Birth: 1797,  in County Limerick, Ireland

Irish Immigrant Wave: 1815 Peace is re-established between the United States and Britain after the War of 1812. Immigration from Western Europe turns from a trickle into a gush, which causes a shift in the demographics of the United States. This first major wave of immigration lasts until the Civil War. source: Castle Garden

Ellen emigrated before 1815 from Ireland  to New York, because she married Eli Hammell in New York City, New York in 1815.

Death: 18 April 1833 New York County (Manhattan), New York. 

Ireland road trees

Road and Trees in Ireland

Wife of Eli Hammell of New York. Daughter-in-law of William Hammell & Catherine (Peevey) of Pennsylvania.

name:Ellen Hammell
gender:Female
burial date:
burial place:
death date:18 Apr 1833
death place:, New York, New York
age:36
birth date:1797
birthplace:Ireland
occupation:
race:
marital status:
spouse’s name:
father’s name:
father’s birthplace:
mother’s name:
mother’s birthplace:
indexing project (batch) number:B73382-6
system origin:New York-EASy
source film number:1318226
reference number:
Citing this Record
“New York Deaths and Burials, 1795-1952,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FD1Z-LZL : accessed 16 Nov 2012), Ellen Hammell, 1797; citing reference , FHL microfilm 1318226.

Family links: 
Spouse:
Eli Hammell (1795 – 1837)

Children:
Maria Ann Hammell (Linderman) (1817 – 1884)

NYC_-_Trinity_Church_-_Watts_statue

Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum

Burial: 1833
Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum
Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA 

Trinity_Church_Bird's_Eye_View_New_York_City_1846

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: May 15, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 110568947

Ireland countrysideIreland

Shamrock – national flower of Ireland

The shamrock, a small clover which is now the national flower of Ireland, was an important symbol to the ancient Irish Druids as a plant naturally displaying the triad with its three heart-shaped leaves.

The Celts believed that everything important in the world came in threes; the three dominions of earth, sky and sea, the three ages of man, and phases of the moon; so a plant with three leaves would have been held in high regard.

St. Patrick used the shamrock in his teaching

St Patrick Stained Glass Window, St. Benin's Church, Kilbennan, County Galway, Ireland copyright detail 2010-09-16 cc3

The shamrock was thought to have mystical properties and the ability to predict the weather; its leaves turn skyward when a storm is brewing. It is believed that St Patrick, on seeing the importance of this small plant to the Druids, used the shamrock to illustrate the Christian teachings of the Holy Trinity, thus spreading the word of Christianity throughout the land in a way that appealed to its people. Many of the Druid high priests are thought to have converted to Christianity, becoming Bishops following St Patrick’s teachings.

Ireland’s best known national symbol

Leprechaun

The shamrock became a symbol of rebellion against the Crown in the 19th century and anyone caught wearing one, risked the hangman’s noose! Today it is Ireland’s most well known national symbol recognized throughout the world.

It is used as a logo by many Irish companies and organizations such as Aer Lingus, and on the 17th of March the shamrock is displayed on anything from beer to bunting to over-large novelty hats as part of the St Patrick’s Day celebrations.

In Celtic lore the shamrock has always been a charm against evil which relates to the modern belief in the four leaf clover as a good luck charm.

Some believe the shamrock even has the power to break a leprechaun’s curse.  source: Wikipedia

My Maternal 4th. Great Irish Grandfather, Eli Hammell

Hammell Family Crest

Tioga County, New York

Tioga County, New York

Name: Eli Hammell, son of William & Catherine (Peevey) Hammell of Pennsylvania.

Birth:  1795 Tioga County, New York, USA

Tioga_County_Courthouse_New_York, 2009

Tioga_County_Courthouse_New_York, 2009

Death: 24 March 1837, Manhattan, New York, New York, USA

Manhattan, New York City, New York

Manhattan, New York City, New York

Married: about 1815 to Ellen Clark (1797-1833) in New York, USA

HAMMELL

This unusual name has two possible origins, the first of which is Scottish but is ultimately of Norman origin, and is a locational surname from the place called “Haineville” or “Henneville” in Manche. The placename derives from the Germanic personal name “Hagano”, which means “hawthorn” and was originally a nickname, found in Medieval England as “Hain” and “Heyne”, with the Old French word “ville”, meaning settlement, village.

The surname as Ham(m)ill and Hom(m)ill was most commonly found in the area known as “Roughwood” in Ayshire. The second origin is from an Anglo-Saxon nickname for a scarred or marred person, from the Old English pre 7th “hamel” meaning “scarred, mutilated”.

On February 10th 1670, Leonard, son of Leonard and Elizabeth Hammell, were married in St. Giles Cripplegate, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Hameville, which was dated circa 1194, in the Records of Holm Cultram, during the reign of King William of Scotland, known as “The Lion”, 1165 – 1214.

Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. 

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Hammell#ixzz2WAdwOeb6

Hammill
United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps
Name: Hammill
Event Type: Military Service
Event Date: 31 May 1813
Event Place: Sacket’s Harbor
Page: 135
Affiliate Publication Number: T1118 , Affiliate Publication Title: Muster Rolls of the United States Marine Corps, 1798-1892 , Affiliate Film Number: 6 , GS Film Number: 001694994 , Digital Folder Number: 005013629 , Image Number: 00212 United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps, 1798-1892
Citing this Record
“United States Muster Rolls of the Marine Corps, 1798-1892”, index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QJ82-GRZF : accessed 23 Oct 2014), Hammill, 1813.

[Sacketts Harbour, Jefferson County, New York ; Because of its strategic protected harbor on Lake Ontario and the military installations built there, the village had national importance through the 19th century.  To support the War of 1812, the US Navy built a major shipyard and its headquarters for the Great Lakes at the village. Within a short period, more than 3,000 men worked at the shipyard. The Army constructed earthworks, forts, barracks and supporting infrastructure to defend the village and navy shipyard, and its troops also camped in town, which was overwhelmed by the number of military.
Soon after the war, the Army strengthened its defenses on the northern frontier by constructing Madison Barracks. Sacket’s Harbor Battlefield State Historic Site commemorates a battle and the contribution of the area to the United States defense during the War of 1812.] Wikipedia

New York Militia
23 Oct 1822
United States
Reason This Information Is Correct
Name: Eli Hammel
Event Type: Military Service
Military Beginning Rank: Private
Military Final Rank: Private
Military Side: Union
State or Military Term: New York
Military Unit:15th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery
Military Company:M
Affiliate Film Number:58
Affiliate Publication Title: Index to Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers Who Served in Organizations From the State of New York. , Affiliate Publication Number: M551 , GS Film number: 882114

name:Eli Hammell
gender:Male
burial date:
burial place:
death date:24 Mar 1837
death place:New York, (City), New York
age:42
birth date:1795
birthplace:
occupation:
race:
marital status:
spouse’s name:
father’s name:
father’s birthplace:
mother’s name:
mother’s birthplace:
indexing project (batch) number:I10254-6
system origin:New York-EASy
source film number:447548
reference number:
Citing this Record
“New York Deaths and Burials, 1795-1952,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F6SS-GWB : accessed 16 Nov 2012), Eli Hammell, 1795; citing reference , FHL microfilm 447548.

Family links:

Parents:
William Hammell (1768 – 1816)

Catherine (Peevey) Hammell (1776 – 1811)

Spouse:
Ellen Clark Hammell (1797 – 1833)

Married: 1815 New York City, New York, USA

Children:
Maria A. (Hammell) Linderman (1817 – 1884)

NYC_-_Trinity_Church_-_Watts_statue

Burial: 1837
Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum 
Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA 

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: May 15, 2013 
Find A Grave Memorial# 110568893

 

My Maternal 3rd. Great Grandmother, Maria “Mary” Hammell, New York

Covered-bridge-newfield-new york

Old Covered Bridge, Newfield, Tompkins, New York

Maria A Mary <i>Hammell</i> Linderman

Maria A Mary <i>Hammell</i> Linderman

Name: Maria A. “Mary” (Hammell) Linderman

Birth: 1817 Newfield, Tompkins County,

New York, USA

Death: 7 March 1884
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA

Daughter of Eli Hammell of New York and Ellen Hammell of Ireland (maiden name unknown).

Maria A. “Mary” Hammell married Abraham Linderman on 26 November 1834 in Newfield Twp, Tompkins County, New York.

Moved to Kane County, Illinois between 1837-8 with Abraham’s father, Ezekiel Linderman.

Moved to Winona, Winona County, Minnesota in 1856.

Maria A Mary <i>Hammell</i> Linderman

 

 

 

 

The old Linderman Home place:

231 E. Mark St., Winona, County, Minnesota.

Mary & Abraham adopted two daughters, Lizzie (James) (Loftus) and Mary Linderman.

The Linderman’s were Lutheran.

1865 Census for Winona, Minnesota shows:
name:Abraham Linderman
event:Census
event date:1865
event place:Winona, 02, Winona, Minnesota, United States
gender:Female
race:
family number:162
volume:11
line number:72
film number:565716
digital folder number:004539664
image number:00891
Household Gender Age Birthplace
A Linderman M
Mary Linderman F
Joseph James M
Lizzie James F
Mary Linderman F
John Freeborn M
(source citation: familysearch.org website)

name: Mary Linderman
gender: Female
burial date:
burial place:
death date: 07 Mar 1884
death place: Winona City, Winona County, Minnesota
age: 67
birth date: 1817
birthplace:
occupation:
race: White
marital status: Married
spouse’s name:
father’s name:
father’s birthplace:
mother’s name:
mother’s birthplace:
indexing project (batch) number: B59705-5
system origin: Minnesota-EASy
gs film number: 1377829
reference id: 159
Citing this Record”Minnesota, Deaths and Burials, 1835-1990,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FDZM-7LP : accessed 04 Mar 2013), Mary Linderman, 07 Mar 1884.

1709 Cheston Drive, and 231 E. Mark St. (2)

Abraham and Mary Linderman’s Homestead @ 231 E. Mark Street, Winona, Winona, Minnesota

DEATH OF OLD SETTLERS
LINDERMAN
“Mary Linderman, wife of A. Linderman, died on the 7th. inst., at her home in this city in her 69th. year. As Mr. and Mrs. Linderman came to reside in Winona in April, 1856, her death takes another from the already diminished list of old settlers. For the past year Mrs. Linderman has been a sufferer from the disease which finally terminated in dropsy and death, but had the unremitting attention of the members of her family and other kind friends. Mrs. Linderman was a woman of marked industry and force of character, and many can testify to her great kindness of heart. A large company of friends were present at the funeral and followed the remains to their resting place in Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota.” 

(source publication: Winona Daily Republican Newspaper; Date: 1884 March 10; Page 3)

Family links:
Spouse:
Abraham Linderman (1811 – 1891)

Children:
Mary Linderman (1859 – 1924)

Woodlawn Cemetery, Winona, Minnesota

Burial:
Woodlawn Cemetery
Winona
Winona County
Minnesota, USA

Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Aug 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21069161

Hello World!

fairy-pools-skye-scotlandIsle of Bute, Rothesay, Scotland

Welcome to my British Roots. Mother had told me that we were German, Norwegian, Luxembourgian, and my daddy was Moravian and Bohemian, but I have discovered that I am also Scottish, Irish, English, French, Danish, and Finnish.

scotland-blue-belles.jpgscottish-flowers.jpgdukeofargylecastlescotlandedinburghcastlescotland

My Maternal 4th. Great Irish Grand Uncle, Lt. Col. William Hammell, Jr.

War_of_1812_Montage

War of 1812-1815 in New York

My maternal 4th. great granduncle, William Hammell, Jr, son of William Hammell, Sr. and Catherine Peavey.

Born: 1792 in Long Island City, Queens, New York

Military: War of 1812-1815 in New York


Name:William Hammell
Event Type:Military Service
Event Date: 29 Sep 1813
Age: 41
Promoted: to 2nd. Lt. on 1 May 1814
Event Place:, , New York, United States
On guard at Fort Swift since 31 Dec. 1814

[Fort Swift (1812-1815) – An American War of 1812 Fort established in 1812 in present day Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. Named Fort Swift after General Joseph G. Swift. Abandoned as a fortification in 1815 at the end of the war.]

On guard at Fort Greene since 9 Mar. 1815
absent without leave 1 April 1815 [sick]

[Fort Greene is a neighborhood in the northwestern part of the New York Cityborough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood is bounded by Flushing Avenue and the Brooklyn Navy Yard to the north, Flatbush Avenue Extension and Downtown Brooklyn to the west, Atlantic Avenue and Prospect Heights to the south, and Vanderbilt Avenue and Clinton Hill to the east. Fort Greene is listed on the New York State Registry and on the National Register of Historic Places, and is a New York City-designated Historic District.

The neighborhood is named after an American Revolutionary War era fort that was built in 1776 under the supervision of General Nathanael Greene of Rhode Island. General Greene aided General George Washington during the Battle of Long Island in 1776. Fort Greene Park, originally called “Washington Park” and Brooklyn’s first, is also derived from General Greene’s name and from the neighborhood.

In 1864, Fort Greene Park was redesigned by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux; the park notably includes the Prison Ship Martyrs’ Monument and crypt, which honors some 11,500 patriots who died aboard British prison ships during the American Revolution.

Fort Greene contains many examples of mid-19th century Italianate and Eastlake architecture, most of which is well preserved. It is known for its many tree-lined streets and elegant low-rise housing. Fort Greene is also home to the Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower, which, for over 80 years, was the tallest building in Brooklyn. The neighborhood is close to the Atlantic Terminal station of the Long Island Rail Road and has access to many New York City Subway services.

Fort Greene is part of Brooklyn Community District 2 and its primary ZIP Codes are 11201, 11205, 11217, and 11238. It is patrolled by the 88th Precinct of the New York City Police Department. Politically it is represented by the New York City Council‘s 35th District. source: Wikipedia]

Volume Number:011
Page:275
Line Number: 5857 , Affiliate Publication Title: Registers of Enlistments in the United States Army, 1798-1914 , Affiliate Publication Number: M233 , Affiliate Film Number: 6 , GS Film Number: 350312 , Digital Folder Number: 004032443 , Image Number: 00599
Citing this Record
“United States Registers of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914”, index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/QJD5-JTH5 : accessed 13 Sep 2014), William Hammell, 1813.

Married: about 1815 in New York to Mary Clark of Ireland

Children: Theresa Hammell (Tiernan)

Manhattan, New York City, New York

Manhattan, New York City, New York

Death: 27 September 1857 in Manhattan, New York City, New York

Burial: September 1857 in Trinity Church Cemetery, Manhattan, New York City, New York

Burial:
Trinity Church Cemetery and Mausoleum
Manhattan
New York County (Manhattan)
New York, USA
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Sep 13, 2015
Find A Grave Memorial# 152232771

NYC_-_Trinity_Church_-_Watts_statue

Trinity Church Cemetery, Manhattan, New York City, New York

My Maternal 2nd. Great Grandmother, Mary Linderman

Linderman Family Genealogy

1709 Cheston Drive, and 231 E. Mark St. (2)

Linderman Homeplace, 231 East Mark Street, Winona, Winona, Minnesota

61186-harrymaryedylinderman

Harry, Mary, Edward Linderman, Dubuque, Iowa, 1920’s

Name: Mary Linderman, my maternal 2nd. great grandmother.
Her adoptive parents were Abraham and Mary (Hammell) LINDERMAN.

Birth parents unknown. Never married. One son, Edward Francis Linderman.
LINDERMAN FAMILY HOMESTEAD WAS AT 231 E. MARK STREET, WINONA, WINONA COUNTY, MINNESOTA 55987.

Aunt Lizzie A. Loftus, Old Linderman Home Place, 231 E. Mark St., Winona, MNAunt Lizzie A. Loftus, Old Linderman Home Place, 231 E. Mark St., Winona, MN

Name: Mary Lindeman,
residence:Winona, Winona, Minnesota,
birthdate:1859,
birthplace:Minnesota, United States,
relationship to head: (Adopted) Daughter,
father’s name: Abraham Linderman,
father’s birthplace: New York, United States,
mother’s name: Mary Linderman,
mother’s birthplace: New York, United States, race or color (expanded): White, ethnicity (standardized): American, gender: Female,
marital status: Single, age (expanded): 21 years, occupation:
nara film number:T9-0638, page:288, page character:D, entry number:2576, film number:1254638, Household Gender Age Birthplace
self Abraham Linderman M 69 New York, United States, wife Mary Linderman…

View original post 202 more words

Edinburgh, Scotland

Ty

This weekend I spent a few days in Edinburgh, Scotland.  This has been one of my favorite weekends to date!  Scotland is gorgeous! As soon as we got there, we went on a walking tour of the town.  On the tour we got to see many of the big sights including Edinburgh Castle, the cafe where JK Rowling wrote most of the first two Harry Potter books, the cemetery where she got some of the names for the books, and many of the churches.  After the tour, we went to a little pub where I tried haggis for the first time.  It tasted delicious, and I enjoyed it as long as I didn’t think about what it was made out of (leftover sheep organs all mashed up and stuffed into its stomach and boiled for four hours).  That night, we went on a ghost tour of Edinburgh.  Edinburgh is one…

View original post 619 more words

On the hunt for Edinburgh’s Ghosts

it's that little feeling of ... Wanderlust

Back in June I visited my friend in Edinburgh. After not seeing each other for over a year it was promising to be a pretty exciting affair. Sure enough, as I hopped off my train and made my way down the platform towards her she almost walked past me…Ok, I haven’t changed that much have I? :p No really, she was just looking further into the distance so all was forgiven 😉

Having lived in Edinburgh for a good year I had the perfect tour guide to show me the town. And, oh behold, the good weather must have followed me from London because we had sunshine for the most part (one very very cloudy day on Arthur’s Seat) while I was there. Sunshine in Scotland?? Yep, I was as amazed as you are.

So what do you do when it is not raining in Scotland? I can’t…

View original post 630 more words

Scotland Travel Photos

Peace, Love, and Jetlag

On Friday morning, we stopped in the town of Stirling and visited the castle. For the majority of this trip, we’ve been lucky and dodged the rain. This morning was a different story, as it was cold, windy, and rainy. I apologize for the quality of the pictures. This was the best I could do in the wind and rain!

The castle overlooks a hill where the monument dedicated to William Wallace (a.k.a. Braveheart) is located. Below is one of my attempts at a picture of it, but I couldn’t get a very clear shot because of the weather. The castle and palace were lovely. In the middle courtyard, you can see the outline of the foundation of the chapel where Mary, Queen of Scots was crowned Queen of Scotland at nine months old.

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View original post

Edinburgh Castle

Peace, Love, and Jetlag

I hit up Edinburgh Castle first thing Tuesday morning. They have optional guided tours inside the castle that are included with your ticket. I joined one of the tours and learned some interesting things about the castle. There is a time-gun in one of the castle’s batteries that is fired at 1 PM every day. Apparently, it’s fired at 1 PM instead of noon so that they can save on ammunition. There is also a 6 ton cannon called Mons Meg that has a range of two miles. It was said that it was so heavy, it would take a team of a hundred men a day to haul it only 3 miles! Some of the cool things you could see inside the castle are the Scottish Crown Jewels (the Honours of Scotland), the Stone of Destiny, and the room where Mary Queen of Scots gave birth to James VI…

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I Love Edinburgh!

Travels with the Blonde Coyote

Now this is my kind of city! Edinburgh is built on the remains of an extinct volcano. The main outlet of the volcano, known as Arthur’s Seat, towers above Old Town, while Edinburgh Castle sits on a second vent of indomitable black rock. Most of this city is carved out of dark, mafic dolerite. I love cities where the Earth is apparent underfoot, unconcealed by an overdose of concrete.

Stay tuned for another view of the city from the Salisbury Crags and Arthur’s Seat!

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Scotland Travel: Edinburgh

Edinburgh Castle

St. Margareths Chapel, Edinburgh

English: Edinburgh Castle as seen from St Cuth...

English: Edinburgh Castle as seen from The Mou...

EDINBURGH CASTLE, SCOTLAND, U.K.

Edinburgh Castle is situated on Castle Rock in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland. Castle Rock formed after a volcano erupted over 340 million years ago. The first castle that existed on the rock was known as “The Castle of the Maidens”. According to legend, the castle had been a shrine to the “Nine Maidens”, one of whom was Morgan le Fay.

 

Castle Rock had been a military base and royal residence for centuries. However, the edifice that is known as Edinburgh Castle was built during the 12th century by David I, son of Saint Margaret of Scotland.

 

The tensions between the English and Scottish monarchies nearly always centered on Edinburgh Castle. He who held the castle held rule over the city of Edinburgh and, therefore, over all of Scotland. Consequently, the castle was almost constantly under siege.

 

The first major battle the castle witnessed was during the late 13th century when Edward I of England attempted to seize the then vacant Scottish throne. From 1296 to 1341, the castle bounced from English to Scottish hands several times during the First and Second Wars of Scottish Independence.

 

After the Wars of Independence, the castle was in great need of repairs. Most of the construction was overseen by David II. In his honour, David’s Tower was erected.

 

In 1571, English forces laid siege to the city of Edinburgh in an attempt to capture Mary, Queen of Scots. The siege, which lasted for two years, became known as the “long” or “Lang” siege. By February of 1573, all of Mary’s supporters had surrendered to the English. During the Lang Siege, David’s Tower was destroyed.

 

The castle, again, witnessed strife when, in 1650, Oliver Cromwell executed Charles I and led an invasion of Scotland. In August of that year, Edinburgh Castle fell into English hands.

 

During the Jacobite Risings (1688-1746), the Scots attempted, several times, to recapture their castle. Unfortunately, they were never able to overpower the English. The final attempt was in 1745 when the Jacobite army was led by Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie). Although the Scots were able to capture the city, they were never able to lay siege to the castle. In November of that year, the Jacobites were forced to retreat.

 

From the late 18th century to the early 19th, Edinburgh Castle was used to hold military prisoners from England’s many wars. The castle became a national monument in 1814 after a mass prison break proved that the castle could not hold prisoners. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, the castle was slowly restored. Military ceremonies began to be held there and, in 1927, part of the castle was turned into the Scottish National War Memorial.

 

Edinburgh Castle is now one of the most popular tourist attractions in Scotland. The more than one million people who visit the castle each year witness military ceremonies, historical re-enactments, and can visit sites such as St. Margaret’s Chapel and the Great Hall of King James IV.

NJ to the World

I never thought I would have ended up in Scotland. Only a few years ago, it would have been completely off my radar in terms of potential places in the world that I’d want to visit. But after meeting a student from the University of Edinburgh in Richmond, I decided to give it a shot. Prior to the trip, my extent of knowledge about the country stemmed from little more than my repeat watching of Braveheart— God, I love that movie. What a soundtrack! Anyway, luckily I was more or less pleasantly surprised by what I found. The capital city of Edinburgh was especially a nice surprise– a beautiful, medieval, quiet city located on Scotland’s east coast. Here I explored grand castles, walked snow-covered city streets, climbed mountains, met Dolly the Sheep, and learned to correctly pronounce the city’s name (no, it is not “burg”, the rest of you…

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Scottish Christmas Traditions

According to Friends of Scotland.gov.uk, “The Vikings stuffed their faces with vast quantities of food and drink after which they stumbled off into the winter night to light a huge bonfire in the goddess’ honour. Today, fire and light plays a major part in Yule celebrations in many areas of Scotland from Biggar to Shetland.

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When William of Normandy conquered England in 1066 the English Princess Margaret fled north and was shipwrecked on the Scottish coast. Her Christian influence helped turn the previously pagan Yuletide season into a celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ.”
scottish-santa-christmasScottish Christmas Tree
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The traditional Scottish Christmas Day MenuSeeing a beautifully-laid table for Christmas Dinner is a sight to behold. One tradition we still have is the use of Christmas Crackers. These are pulled, and create a wee ‘bang’ and inside is a variety trinkets such as a joke, a wee toy or gift (depends on the quality of the cracker) and the inevitable paper hat. EVERYONE (yes, I thin almost everyone)sits though Christmas Dinner wearing a silly paper hat! (see the picture of the Christmas Cracker with the mince pies)Over the years many main dishes have become traditional for Christmas Dinner. Roast Turkey is still in my opinion the most popular, but whether in a family home, restaurant or Hotel, many other dishes are often on the menu.

 

Starters: Perhaps it’s because of the cold weather, but soup is often served as a starter. It could be Cock O Leekie Soup. traditional-scottish-christmas-turkey